Digital fusion (also called digifu) is music that blends many musical genres with early PC music styles that were shaped by hardware limitations, such as video game music, demoscene/tracker music, chiptune, and MIDI.

 

Digital fusion is an evolution of these computer music styles, where composers have adopted their vernacular without their original hardware limitations.

Some examples of techniques that digital fusion composers use include:

  • Tracker and chiptune-based techniques: composing with simple wave forms, rapid arpeggios, single channel delay, sampled chords.
     

  • MIDI-based techniques: focusing on a twelve-tone scale or piano roll, arranging with 16 channels or a low number of instruments.
     

  • Virtual improvisation: solos in which the process of creation is more spontaneous than a planned composition, but more premeditated than live improvisation, because of being tracked or sequenced into a computer.
     

  • Combining the above with full production or acoustic performances.